Intermittent fasting study over 12 weeks – Episode 5

Time-restricted eating (TRE) has been touted as a miracle solution for weight loss and metabolic health improvement. The idea behind TRE is that by limiting food intake to a specific period of the day, typically within a 12-hour window, individuals can reduce caloric intake and improve their circadian rhythm. However, a recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that TRE may not be as effective as previously thought.

The study followed 116 overweight or obese individuals over a 12-week period and randomly assigned them to either a TRE group or a control group. The TRE group was instructed to eat all of their meals within a 12-hour window each day, while the control group could eat as they normally would. Both groups were provided with nutritional counseling and a weight loss goal of at least 5% of their initial body weight.

At the end of the study period, researchers found that both groups had lost weight, but there was no significant difference in weight loss between the TRE group and the control group. The TRE group lost an average of 0.94 kg (2.07 lbs.), while the control group lost an average of 1.25 kg (2.76 lbs.).

These results are disappointing for those who have been touting TRE as a miracle solution for weight loss and metabolic health improvement. While there may be some benefits to TRE, this study suggests that it may not be as effective as previously thought.

It is important to note that the medical community is suggesting that this is a good diet approach. If someone had 30 lbs. to lose it would take them based on the findings in this JAMA study it would take up to 16 months. Do you think that is a good approach to losing weight?

It is also important to note that TRE may not be appropriate for everyone. Individuals with certain medical conditions, such as diabetes, may need to eat more frequently to manage their blood sugar levels. Additionally, some individuals may find it difficult to stick to a restricted eating window, which could lead to binge eating or other unhealthy behaviors. So, this is another huge limitation to TRE.

In conclusion, while TRE may have some potential benefits, the recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that it may not be as effective as previously thought for weight loss. The good news is that two new studies published in the Nutrition Journal and the Obesity Journal showed participants losing on average 16 lbs. in a month with a gain of 6% lean muscle mass. In addition the participants in the study also showed a significant drop In weight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and lowered triglycerides. Also none of the participants were allowed to exercise and 80% of the people in the study were women. The results showed that by utilizing a revolutionary new approach called the R2m protocol that incorporated Intermittent Nutritional Fasting™ (Not Intermittent fasting) and Protein Pacing® it produced health results never seen in over 3 decades of research conducted on diets and nutritional approaches. The study concluded that the improvement in metabolic factors was so exciting that it overshadowed the incredible weight loss numbers.